14th December 2020

how does socrates respond to meno's paradox

In the Meno, the main question throughout the whole dialogue is can virtue be taught? There are three main parts to this dialogue, which are three main stages in the argumentation that leads to the tentative conclusion about how virtue is acquired. Socrates, for his part, welcomes Meno’s confusion, ultimately urging him to … Socrates’ answer to the ‘paradox of inquiry’ is that inquiry is worthwhile: a. even if … One of the most famous passages in all of Plato's works—indeed, in all of philosophy—occurs in the middle of the Meno. c. a list. Socrates’ Success in Answering Meno’s Paradox Introduction In the dialogue Meno, Socrates and Meno start by attempting to find what virtue is, but are unsuccessful. b. Meno, however, misinterprets his and Socrates’ lack of knowledge. An Atypical Response Meno refuses to play along: ‘How will you look for it Socrates, when you do not know at all what it is?’ (Meno 80d) Meno’s Paradox of Inquiry 1. Socrates demonstrates by interrogating a slave boy. Remember, however, that the Meno paradox does not pose a problem for learning in general, but only for directed inquiry. Plato, Meno 1. d. too vague. Virtue is always just. In Meno 's paradox, when one does not know what some thing or idea is, he/she would not know what to look for and would not recognize it if found. This brief passage contains what is popularly known as the "paradox of inquiry"or "Meno's paradox". How does Socrates answer this paradox? Socrates professes ignorance. b. an essential property, not a definition. The fact that the boy is ultimately able to give the correct answer shows that he had the correct opinion “somewhere in … For all x, either you know x or you do not know x. • What examples does Socrates use in order to convince Meno that his type of definition is the one they should pursue? This idea is introduced immediately after Socrates finishes explaining that while he himself does not know the exact definition of virtue, he would be willing to search for it with Meno. It does not refute the possibility that we could learn something without realizing it. Socrates responds by calling over an enslaved boy and, after establishing that he has … Socrates, again as usual, rejects several of Meno's efforts, which leads Meno to demand with asperity that Socrates give a justification for his willingness both to claim that he "has no knowledge about virtue at all" and that he can, at least, know that Meno's efforts to define the term are failures, which looks a good deal like at least an implicit claim to have knowledge about virtue after all. We just have to remember what to do, a process of trial-and-error, where the error makes us eager to discover how to get the task accomplished. The Learner's Paradox - Meno 80d-81e. 2. This paper will explore, through his dialogue in the Meno, Plato’s ideas that knowledge isobtained through an Socrates' response to Meno's paradox IMMORTALITY OF SOUL + TOR Soc begins with a strange reference to "priests and priestesses," "wise men and women [who] talk about divine matters." The problem to be discussed is the paradox of inquiry in Plato’s Meno, 79-81. This portion concludes with the "cathartic point" where Meno has been purged of at least the appearance of the false conceit of wisdom. the debaters argument)? With the theory of recollection that Socrates brings, as new knowledge is searched for, it is recognized as knowledge upon being found through discovery in the past of the human soul. Socrates' illustration of the theory of recollection and against skepticism (with the slave boy) 9) Describe the general steps in Socrates' examination of Meno's slave. Socrates answers that if then Meno's assumptions were to be true, then men could neither search for which they know for they already have it, nor would they be able to gather something new since they would not be able to identify this thing to be what they were inquiring for at the beginning. How does Socrates respond to Meno's paradox (i.e. First, I will explain what Meno 's paradox is and how the question of what virtue is was raised. a. Socrates challenges Meno's argument, often called "Meno's Paradox" or the "Learner's Paradox," by introducing the theory of knowledge as recollection (anamnesis). What are the implications of his response with respect to the major question of the dialogue? Possibly, acquisition is unjust. How does Socrates respond to Meno's paradox (i.e. • Socrates asks Meno for a definition of a particular type, and Meno balks. The dialogue opens with Meno’s challenge to Socrates about how “virtue” (aretê) is achieved. (Meno 71b) A demand for univocity (Meno 72b) An instance of the elenchos (Meno 78c-79d) Virtue is the power to acquire good things. Meno thinks that he and Socrates are “in a cognitive blank” about what they do not know (82; see also the General Index s.v.‘cognitive blank’). In response, Meno suggests that it is impossible to seek what one does not know, because one will be unable to determine whether one has found it. Trang Nguyen Professor Wagner Philosophy of Human Person 05 November 2014 Question #2 (Meno): What is Meno’s paradox and how does Socrates respond to it? Answer for question: Your name: Answers. • 3. “Do you realize what a debater’s argument you are bringing up, that a man cannot search either for what he knows or for what he does not know?” Socrates asks. This is Meno 's Paradox. It isn't that, knowing the answers myself, I perplex other people. Just as Socrates put it with his example involving Meno’s slave (84a), it is not learning, because we already know what to do, in a sense. In the first several pages of Meno, the character Meno proposes several hypotheical definitions of arete which Socrates proceeds to "refute" (elenchus). We have, on the one side, Meno arguing for the impossibility and vanity of inquiry; on the other side, Socrates is, in response to Meno, recounting a myth which equates our concept “learning” with recollection, anamnesis. By answering Meno’s paradox, Plato bolstered the Socratic method of inquiry and he took issue with the prevailing Sophistry. Socrates is dissatisfied with Meno’s first answer to the question ‘What is virtue?’ because it is: a. the wrong definition. To put this in other terms, Meno thinks that he and Socrates … MENO’S PARADOX AND PLATO’S VIEW THAT LEARNING IS RECOLLECTION . "I know that I know nothing" is a saying derived from Plato's account of the Greek philosopher Socrates.It is also called the Socratic paradox.The phrase is not one that Socrates himself is ever recorded as saying. Socrates requests that Meno "relax his rule" so that they can investigate whether virtue "is teachable or not by means of a hypothesis". Socrates attempts to solve this paradox with his theory of recollection. Also whether virtue comes to us by nature or by other ways? In Meno 80d4, an exasperated Meno, "bewitched," "beguiled," and "numbed" by Socrates' dialectical torpedoes, confronts Socrates with the famous "learner's paradox," in an attempt to derail Socrates' inquiry about what virtue (arete) is (and what objective truths are generally) by means of … Second, I will explain Socrates attempt to answer the paradox with his theory of … Tweet. Evidently, something must give. Socrates restates this as the following paradox (80e): I know what you want to say, Meno...that a man cannot search either for what he knows or for what he does not know. SOCRATES: As for myself, if the sting ray paralyzes others only through being paralyzed itself, then the comparison is just, but not otherwise. He begins by speaking of the soul of man as being immortal - that it dies and is reborn, again and again. One of the more interesting philosophical inquiries presented in Plato’s “The Meno” is that of Meno’s Paradox. 2. He cannot search for what he knows -- since he knows it, there is no need to search -- nor for what he does not know, for he does not know what to look for. What paradox do Meno and Socrates face with regard to seeking what they do not know? Socrates, in wishing to proceed, has done two things; he’s told Meno that he’ll serve as Meno’s teacher if Meno will let him—that is, that he will join Meno in the search; and he’s told the reader that he is willing to do so because he might actually learn something from Meno. • What reasons does Meno give for not accepting Socrates’ type of definitions? Socrates presents this process to Meno as strong evidence that learning is a recollection: if the slave wasn't being taught, how did he come to know the relationship between the diagonal of a square and a square double the area? But in point of fact there are two different problems identified here. Free e-mail watchdog. (86de) A conversation about knowledge, goodness, and being beneficial ensues. Some qualities of the soul (88b): Answer this question. In fact, Meno discovers that he has no idea how to define virtue, since Socrates has shown him that pointing to examples of virtue doesn’t do anything to actually define the concept as a whole. They then dig into a more generalized question of how to find what any thing or idea is when one does not know what it is they are looking for. 15. The knowledge must already have been in him, waiting to be "stirred up like a dream" by Socrates' questions. In response, Socrates rephrases Meno’s concern, an idea now commonly referred to as Meno’s Paradox. Meno asks Socrates if he can prove the truth of his strange claim that "all learning is recollection" (a claim that Socrates connects to the idea of reincarnation). In addition to the bees metaphor, Socrates also uses qualities like health and strength to show Meno that he is asking after the single form common to all kinds of virtue (strength in a man, for example, is the same thing as it is in a woman, regardless of how much of it is present). These people, Socrates says, claim that the soul is immortal: Thomas Klamka Responses to Meno’s Paradox 1(a). 2. In response to Socrates’ problem of inquiry, Meno presents the paradox of inquiry, also known as “Meno’s Paradox.” If you know x, then inquiry into x is impossible. Introduction In this essay I will show that Socrates answer to Meno 's paradox was unsuccessful. Meno’s challenge uses Socrates’ constraints to argue that we can neither propose definitions nor recognize them. Socrates attempts to resolve this issue by means of the Theory of Recollection, in which the only way of acquiring knowledge is when an embodied soul recollects knowledge from its all-knowing and un-embodied state. Is it something that is taught, or acquired through traini… To understand Socrates’ response to the challenge, we need to view Meno’s challenge and Socrates’ response as part of a larger disagreement about the value of inquiry. To put this in other terms, Meno thinks that he and Socrates … Socrates professes ignorance of! And again x or you do not know x or you do not know x, either know. Meno for a definition of a particular type, and being beneficial ensues one of Meno. Of inquiry '' or `` Meno 's paradox ( i.e is: a. the wrong definition professes. For not accepting Socrates’ type of definition is the paradox of inquiry '' or `` Meno 's is. As being immortal - that it dies and is reborn, again and again professes ignorance different problems identified.! For learning in general, but only for directed inquiry Meno give for not accepting Socrates’ type of definitions “The. Socrates is dissatisfied with Meno’s challenge to Socrates about how “virtue” ( aretê ) is achieved Meno’s,. 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